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"Um, Actually," there is a game show of nerd pwnage

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"From Morlocks to warlocks, nerds are passionate about a lot of things, but there's one thing they love above all else and that is correcting people*." So begins each intro to the CollegeHumor game show, "Um, Actually." Nimbly hosted by Mike Trapp, the rules for Um, Actually are simple. Mike reads a statement related to various fantasy and sci-fi universes and beloved nerd media (Lord of the Rings, Blade Runner, D&D, Dune, Warhammer, Harry Potter, anime, gaming, etc). The statement conceals a mistake. One of the three contestants buzzes in with their correction. And they must preface their correction with "Um, actually..." Many of the contestants on the show are familiar faces from Geek & Sundry, The Nerdist, CollegeHumor, and shows like Silicon Valley.

When "Um, Actually" first showed up on YouTube a few years ago, as 6-12-minute shorts, I really enjoyed the 8 episodes they produced and thought it would make a fun full-length show. CollegeHumor obviously thought the same. They have launched a second season of full-length (24 minutes) episodes as part of their new Dropout.tv subscription comedy network. Here is one of the full-length episodes and several of the teasers from CollgeHumor's YouTube channel.

The show also encourages its viewers to correct any of its mistakes, and as you might imagine, there are a lot of them @UmActuallyShow (some of which are read at the end of each episode).

You can see all of the short YouTube segments for Season 2 here. Season 1 is here. And, if you want to see all of the Season 2 episodes, Dropout has a 7 day trial. Subscriptions are $4/month.

*Um, actually, the two subjects of nerd passions change in each episode's introduction.

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InShaneee
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Chicago, IL
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Proof

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Click here to go see the bonus panel!

Hovertext:
(Sorry)


Today's News:
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InShaneee
23 hours ago
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1 public comment
rclatterbuck
21 hours ago
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I knew there was a joke in there somewhere!

Cragne Manor, an 84-room horror "exquisite corpse" text adventure that's a tribute to the classic game Anchorhead

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It's the 20th anniversary of Anchorhead, Michael Gentry's seminal horror text adventure; to commemorate the occasion, Ryan Veeder and Jenni Polodna worked with 84 developers to create Cragne Manor, a tribute, whose puzzles are ingenious, frustrating and amazing.

Each of the developers was given one room to create, without any knowledge of the others developers' rooms, making "each location ... a different author's take on a tribute to Anchorhead, or an original work of Lovecraftian cosmic horror, or a deconstruction of cosmic horror, or a gonzo parody of cosmic horror, or a parody of some other thing, or a portrait of life in Vermont, or a pure experiment in writing with Inform 7, or something else entirely. There are tons of puzzles. The puzzles get very weird."

Early reviews are very positive: Zarf updates says "It's glorious. It's a mess. It's a glorious mess... It's a grand collection of vignettes by the biggest collective of IF authors ever gathered in one fictional Vermont town. It's a demonstration of varied styles, varied approaches to puzzle design, and varied takes on the idea of 'Lovecraftian/Anchorheadian game'. It's creepy and funny and gross and poetic."

Emily Short writes: "I can tell you already that if you like parser IF, you want to play this. It’s sometimes scary, sometimes disgusting, sometimes funny, sometimes weird, and sometimes all of those at once — but I’ll let you find the horse for yourself. And somehow all that surreal adds up to something greater than the sum of its parts."

Your name is Naomi Cragne. Your husband is missing. That's why you're taking the train to Vermont, to look for him in his family's old mansion. You'll explore creepy environments, consult eldritch tomes, and solve bizarre puzzles as you search for Peter, but your surroundings, your past, and even your identity seem to change subtly—or dramatically—as you make your way through the town of Backwater and approach Cragne Manor.

Cragne Manor [Ryan Veeder and Jenni Polodna/Rcveeder]

(via /.)

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InShaneee
23 hours ago
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Review: Keyforge

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For our last review of the year, Matt pulled out all the stops... and then Quinns appeared and started plugging them back in again. It seems this pair can't quite agree on Keyforge. Is it fun, or not-fun? Is the business model good or bad? Is the universe a joke or a failure? Let us know your experience with Keyforge in the comments! Whatever our thoughts on it, Keyforge's staggering initial sales hint that this game is going to be with us for quite some time.
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InShaneee
1 day ago
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Make this scale model of the Dr. Nim digital game

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Dr Nim is a plastic, gravity powered computer from the 1960s that plays the game, Nim, against a human player. Recently Michael Gardi made a 3D scale model of Dr Nim, which you can download and print on a 3D printer.

The Amazing Dr. Nim is a toy invented by John Thomas Godfrey and manufactured by Education Science Research (E.S.R., Inc.) in the mid-1960s. It consists of a marble-powered plastic computer capable of playing the game of Nim. The machine selects its moves through the action of the marbles falling through the levers of the machine.

The "game board" is a based on the mechanical Digi-Comp II digital computer (also a Godfrey creation). It has memory switches that hold bits of data. The unit is programmed by lobed levers that affect and are affected by marbles that are released from the top of the game. Three of the levers set the start position. The fourth lever is the 'equalizer' option; if set, the player can win if they play perfectly. The last lever is used to indicate who's turn it is, the human or Dr. Nim's.

Game play is described in the manual that was bundled with the game and can be found here:

The Amazing Dr. Nim Manual

There are many good online references for the game. The following video is especially informative and entertaining:

The Unbeatable Game from the 60s: Dr NIM

And this article speaks to the relevance of a game like Dr. Nim in today's digital world:

Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories - Dr. Nim

The Dr. Nim offered here is a 2/3rd scale model of the original (.673 to be precise). This keeps the size of the game down to about 210 mm x 205 mm which will hopefully make Dr. Nim accessible to more 3D printers out there (including mine ;-). I have tried to keep the game as true to the original as possible within the constraints of the differing technologies (FDM vs injection molding) and the information available to me. One other concession was to 3D print the folding stand rather than attempting to employ the wire stand of the original.

I did not in fact own an original Dr. Nim when I created this model. The model you see here was developed from pictures obtained online, and from pictures and information graciously provided by Dr. Nim owners. Thank you so much Jaap Scherphuis and Charles E. Leiserson!

Recently I did acquire a vintage Dr. Nim. Upon inspection the only thing I changed was the angle that the game is played at (about 30 degrees) as determined by the Hinge Stoppers.

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InShaneee
1 day ago
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The Cousin Explainer is very helpful

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Even as an adult, I am entirely confused by cousin relationships beyond "first." This chart is very helpful though it lacks the category of "kissing cousin."

(via r/mildlyinteresting)

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InShaneee
1 day ago
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